Immunity 1.0

Hi,

Earlier last week I received a text from the local health centre saying I was eligible for the COVID19 vaccine. You get early doors if you’re a duffer like me. 🙂 Self mockery aside, I’ve not had to isolate unlike my folks have or my in-laws, so things to be thankful for. Likewise, no side effects except a slight pain in my upper arm for about a day. The injection needle was one of those very fine ones, so you hardly felt it.

Luckily, the vaccination centre wasn’t far from where I work, so not a massive faff to get to. Or perhaps more accurately, not far from where I would drive in, only to sit in front of a computer, and be late to meetings because of yet more travel. Waiting for others who also had to travel in because that’s how we’ve always done things. 😛 Thankfully, things have changed, so reasons to be cheerful.

Many years ago on a day or with Val

The bit that struck me was as I sat in the waiting area post jab, there was that quiet murmur of voices. A background chatter I’ve not heard for over a year. A gentle rumbling, laugher, and the sound of life. It reminded me of the time spent enjoying a tea in a café when you don’t have to be anywhere. Those moments of quiet reflection alone or otherwise, and life drifts post you love water in a stream.

It seems so different after twelve months of pretty much being at home with my family, talking to the staff at the Co-op, or working with colleagues remotely. As someone who likes their own space but who also is quite ‘peopley’, the sense of being with others was really rather lovely.

L x

6 Comments

  1. I had a similar feeling when I got my jab at a big hospital set up. It felt like everyone was keen to be chatty in a kind way as if we were all reconnecting with normal life. Those inconsequential interactions that we have with strangers turn out not to be so inconsequential after all – they are like aspirin for the soul.
    I think I will also do a shout out for the NHS vaccination staff and volunteers who were efficient and lovely in equal measure.

    1. “…aspirin for the soul…”

      What a beautiful phrase! 👍

      Yes, absolutely on your point about the NHS team. They’re doing an amazing job and very much deserve an increase in wages, bless ’em.

  2. I’m glad you’ve had your first jab. I keep getting texts from the UK’s NHS to get mine but being restricted to one town a thousand miles away makes it difficult! I think it’s a race now between who gets to stab me with a needle first, the local doctors or the UK ones. Maybe I could have one dose in one country and the other in another. Have passport, will vax!

    You are right about the need for the buzz of human life around us, even that of strangers. No one can live isolated for ever. As self-employed I’ve always felt it essential to get out every day, e.g. to a café in the morning and shops/pubs/restaurants in the evening, even if there’s no-one there I know. Here’s to big gatherings again!

    Looking very elegant in the tea room there, Mrs.

    Your good health!

    Sue x

    1. Wikl there be a new reality show – The Vaccinator? “Are you Sue Richmond? *jab* “I’ll be back in three months.” 🙂

      Socially, I am in video calls for most of the working week, so I get a lot of chatter fun that. Yes, it’s not the same vibe as that lovely hubbub, but it helps. Likewise, with the Thursday night online chats with the Chams folk and long walks with the Ever Lovely Mrs J. Yesterday’s long walk through the fields was beautiful: blue skies, birdsong, a cool breeze, warm sun, and plenty of time.

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